Science

FILE - In this April 19, 2010, file photo, baby powder is squeezed from its bottle in Philadelphia. In a study released on Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2020, U.S. government researchers found no evidence linking baby powder with ovarian cancer in the largest-ever analysis of an issue that has prompted thousands of lawsuits and a recent product recall. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
Associated Press
January 07, 2020 - 12:25 pm
U.S. government-led research found no strong evidence linking baby powder with ovarian cancer in the largest analysis to look at the question. The findings were called “overall reassuring” in an editorial published Tuesday with the study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The...
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A Navy helicopter hovers at Whakatane Airport, as the recovery operation to return the victims of the Dec. 9 volcano eruption continues off the coast of Whakatane New Zealand, Friday, Dec. 13, 2019. A team of eight New Zealand military specialists landed on White Island early Friday to retrieve the bodies of victims after the Dec. 9 eruption. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
Associated Press
December 13, 2019 - 2:39 am
WHAKATANE, New Zealand (AP) — As grieving families sang traditional Maori songs, New Zealand military specialists wearing protective gear landed on a small volcanic island on Friday and recovered six bodies of the 16 people who died in an eruption four days earlier. The specialists — six men and...
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This undated photo provided by MIT/Langer Lab shows a star-shaped gastric resident dosage form of birth control that can be folded into a standard capsule and orally ingested. The dosage form resides in the stomach for up to a month where it releases the contraceptive drug.​ (Paramesh Karandikar/MIT/Langer Lab via AP)
Associated Press
December 04, 2019 - 1:05 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Birth control pills work great if women remember to take them every day but missing doses can mean a surprise pregnancy. Now scientists have figured out how to pack a month’s supply into one capsule. The trick: A tiny star-shaped gadget that unfolds in the stomach and gradually...
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Johnny Lopez
November 20, 2019 - 8:14 am
Apparently, one human year does not equal seven in dog years. While the common formula to convert your four-legged friend’s age into the canine equivalent has been to simply multiply it by seven, it has no scientific backing . There's a Better Way Calculate Your Dog's True Age in Dog Years,...
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FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 4, 2019, file photo, a man using an electronic cigarette exhales in Mayfield Heights, Ohio. On Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2019, the American Medical Association said it is calling for an immediate ban on all electronic cigarette and vaping devices. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
Associated Press
November 19, 2019 - 7:46 pm
The American Medical Association on Tuesday called for an immediate ban on all electronic cigarettes and vaping devices. The group adopted the sweeping stance at a policy-making meeting in San Diego. It aims to lobby for state and federal laws, regulations or legal action to achieve a ban, but the...
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FILE - In this June 7, 2014, file photo, Odessa High School graduates pose for a group portrait prior to the start of the commencement ceremony in Odessa, Texas. Lower-performing students are doing worse in math and reading, dragging down overall results on the Nation’s Report Card. American fourth graders overall posted a slight decline in8 math and a slight gain in reading, while eighth graders saw results fall in both reading and math. That’s according to results released Wednesday on the 2019 National Assessment of Educational Progress, a nationwide test. (Edyta Blaszczyk/Odessa American via AP)
Associated Press
October 30, 2019 - 12:00 am
ATLANTA (AP) — America's eighth graders are falling behind in math and reading, while fourth graders are doing slightly better in reading, according to the latest results from the Nation's Report Card . But there were some exceptions to the findings, which also showed declines among fourth graders...
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FILE - This 2014 file electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows numerous, spheroid-shaped enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68) virions. Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious and rare illness, called acute flaccid myelitis or AFM, that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. University of California, San Francisco, researchers tested how the immune system fought back and found clear signs that an enterovirus, a common seasonal virus that specialists have suspected, was indeed the culprit. The the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted that AFM spikes coincided with seasons when certain strains of enteroviruses - EV-D68 and EV-A71 - were causing widespread respiratory illnesses. (Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Yiting Zhang/CDC via AP, File)
Associated Press
October 21, 2019 - 10:25 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have found the strongest evidence yet that a virus is to blame for a mysterious illness that can start like the sniffles but quickly paralyze children. The paralysis is very rare. U.S. health officials have confirmed 590 cases over the past five years. Finding the cause...
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FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2018 file photo, a doctor performs an ultrasound scan on a pregnant woman at a hospital in Chicago. A new study released Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, suggests when a pregnant woman breathes in air pollution, it can travel beyond her lungs to the placenta that guards her fetus. During pregnancy, particle pollution is linked to premature births and low birth weight, but scientists don’t understand why. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford, File)
Associated Press
September 17, 2019 - 10:18 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study suggests when a pregnant woman breathes in air pollution, it can travel beyond her lungs to the placenta that guards her fetus. Pollution composed of tiny particles from car exhaust, factory smokestacks and other sources is dangerous to everyone's health, and during...
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File - In this Sept. 14, 2017, file photo, salmon circle just below the surface inside a lock where they joined boats heading from salt water Shilshole Bay into fresh water Salmon Bay at the Ballard Locks in Seattle. Federal scientists say they're monitoring a new ocean heat wave off the West Coast. Researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019, the expanse of unusually warm water stretches from Alaska to California, and it resembles a similar heatwave that disrupted marine life five years ago. It remains to be seen whether this heat wave will linger or dissipate more quickly than the last one. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
Associated Press
September 05, 2019 - 4:48 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Federal scientists said Thursday they are monitoring a new ocean heat wave off the U.S. West Coast, a development that could badly disrupt marine life including salmon, whales and sea lions. The expanse of unusually warm water stretches from Alaska to California, researchers with the...
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FBI investigators unload equipment to begin examining evidence obtained from the wreckage of the dive boat Conception on Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019, in Santa Barbara, Calif. A fire raged through the boat carrying recreational scuba divers anchored near an island off the Southern California Coast on Monday, Sept. 2, leaving multiple people dead. (AP Photo/Christian Monterrosa)
Associated Press
September 04, 2019 - 6:06 pm
SANTA BARBARA, Calif. (AP) — Only one person remained missing Wednesday after searchers recovered 33 bodies from the charred underwater wreckage of a dive boat that caught fire off the Southern California coast and sank on Labor Day. Among the victims were an engineer for Apple who went on the trip...
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