Neurological disorders

FILE - In this Aug. 14, 2018 file photo, a doctor looks at a PET brain scan at the Banner Alzheimers Institute in Phoenix. Two experimental drugs failed to prevent or slow mental decline in a study of people who are virtually destined to develop Alzheimer's disease at a relatively young age because of rare gene flaws. The results announced Monday, Feb. 10, 2020, are another disappointment for the approach that scientists have focused on for many years -- trying to remove a harmful protein that builds up in the brains of people with the disease. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
Associated Press
February 10, 2020 - 7:04 am
Two experimental drugs failed to prevent or slow mental decline in a study of people who are virtually destined to develop Alzheimer's disease at a relatively young age because they inherited rare gene flaws. The results announced Monday are another disappointment for the approach that scientists...
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FILE - In this Oct. 11, 2019, file image taken with a slow shutter speed a soccer player runs for the ball during the Euro 2020 group A qualifying soccer match in Prague, Czech Republic. A study, from the University of Glasgow and reported Monday, Oct. 21, in New England Journal of Medicine, of former professional soccer players in Scotland found that they were less likely to die of common causes such as heart disease and cancer compared with the general population but more likely to die from dementia. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek, File)
Associated Press
October 21, 2019 - 11:53 am
LONDON (AP) — A study of former professional soccer players in Scotland finds that they were less likely to die of common causes such as heart disease and cancer compared with the general population but more likely to die from dementia. The results raise fresh concerns about head-related risks from...
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FILE - In this July 9, 1969, file photo, New York Mets right-handed pitcher Tom Seaver makes a second-inning delivery against the Chicago Cubs at New York's Shea Stadium where he hurled a one-hitter in a 4-0 victory. Seaver has been diagnosed with dementia and has retired from public life. The family of the 74-year-old made the announcement Thursday, March 7, 2019, through the Hall and said Seaver will continue to work in the vineyard at his home in California. (AP Photo/File)
March 07, 2019 - 7:26 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Hall of Fame pitcher Tom Seaver, the star of the Miracle Mets 1969 World Series championship team, has been diagnosed with dementia at age 74. His family made the announcement Thursday through the Hall and said Seaver has retired from public life. He will continue to work at Seaver...
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In this April 21, 2018 photo provided by Rachel Wasser, Walmart greeter John Combs works at a Walmart store in Vancouver, Wash. Combs, who has cerebral palsy, and other greeters with disabilities are threatened with job loss as Walmart transforms the greeter position into one that’s more physically demanding. Combs was devastated and then angered by his impending job loss. (Rachel Wasser via AP)
February 27, 2019 - 3:33 pm
As Walmart moves to phase out its familiar blue-vested "greeters" at some 1,000 stores nationwide, disabled workers who fill many of those jobs say they're being ill-treated by a chain that styles itself as community-minded and inclusive. Walmart told greeters around the country last week that...
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This microscope image provided by the Van Andel Research Institute in October 2018 shows an abnormal protein that is a hallmark of Parkinson’s disease clumped inside the appendix. New research suggests Parkinson’s, a brain disease, may get its start in the gut _ specifically, the appendix. (Van Andel Research Institute via AP)
October 31, 2018 - 1:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have found a new clue that Parkinson's disease may get its start not in the brain but in the gut — the appendix, to be exact. New research suggests the appendix acts as a reservoir for an abnormal protein that inside the brain becomes a hallmark of Parkinson's. And...
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October 16, 2018 - 2:54 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. health officials on Tuesday reported a jump in cases of a rare paralyzing illness in children, and said it seems to be following an every-other-year pattern. At least 62 cases have been confirmed in 22 states this year, and at least 65 additional illnesses in those states are...
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