Medical research

In this Jan. 31, 2019 photo, students walk on the Northeastern University campus in Boston. As concerns about China's virus outbreak spread, universities all over the world are scrambling to assess the risks to their programs. (AP Photo/Rodrique Ngowi)
Associated Press
February 06, 2020 - 5:54 am
As concerns about China's virus outbreak spread, universities are scrambling to assess the risks to their programs, and some are canceling study-abroad opportunities and prohibiting travel affecting hundreds of thousands of students. From Europe to Australia and the United States, universities in...
Read More
FILE - In this April 19, 2010, file photo, baby powder is squeezed from its bottle in Philadelphia. In a study released on Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2020, U.S. government researchers found no evidence linking baby powder with ovarian cancer in the largest-ever analysis of an issue that has prompted thousands of lawsuits and a recent product recall. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
Associated Press
January 07, 2020 - 12:25 pm
U.S. government-led research found no strong evidence linking baby powder with ovarian cancer in the largest analysis to look at the question. The findings were called “overall reassuring” in an editorial published Tuesday with the study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The...
Read More
FILE - In this July 23, 2009 file photo, children are silhouetted by the setting sun as they ride a swing ride during the Canyon County Fair in Caldwell, Idaho. New results published Monday, Dec. 9, 2019, in JAMA Pediatrics from the largest long-term study of brain development and children’s health raise provocative questions about obesity and brain function. (Greg Kreller/The Idaho Press-Tribune via AP, File)
Associated Press
December 09, 2019 - 12:31 pm
New results from the largest long-term study of brain development and children’s health raise provocative questions about obesity and brain function. Does excess body weight somehow reduce brain regions that regulate planning and impulse control? Is obesity a result of that brain difference? Or are...
Read More
FILE - In this Oct. 11, 2019, file image taken with a slow shutter speed a soccer player runs for the ball during the Euro 2020 group A qualifying soccer match in Prague, Czech Republic. A study, from the University of Glasgow and reported Monday, Oct. 21, in New England Journal of Medicine, of former professional soccer players in Scotland found that they were less likely to die of common causes such as heart disease and cancer compared with the general population but more likely to die from dementia. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek, File)
Associated Press
October 21, 2019 - 11:53 am
LONDON (AP) — A study of former professional soccer players in Scotland finds that they were less likely to die of common causes such as heart disease and cancer compared with the general population but more likely to die from dementia. The results raise fresh concerns about head-related risks from...
Read More
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., left, and former Vice President Joe Biden hug during a Democratic presidential primary debate hosted by CNN/New York Times at Otterbein University, Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2019, in Westerville, Ohio. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
Associated Press
October 16, 2019 - 9:35 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Health care memo to Democrats: There's more than one way to get to coverage for all. A study out Wednesday finds that an approach similar to the plan from former Vice President Joe Bide n can deliver about the same level of coverage as the government-run "Medicare for All" plan...
Read More
FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2018 file photo, a doctor performs an ultrasound scan on a pregnant woman at a hospital in Chicago. A new study released Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, suggests when a pregnant woman breathes in air pollution, it can travel beyond her lungs to the placenta that guards her fetus. During pregnancy, particle pollution is linked to premature births and low birth weight, but scientists don’t understand why. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford, File)
Associated Press
September 17, 2019 - 10:18 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study suggests when a pregnant woman breathes in air pollution, it can travel beyond her lungs to the placenta that guards her fetus. Pollution composed of tiny particles from car exhaust, factory smokestacks and other sources is dangerous to everyone's health, and during...
Read More
This 2011 digitally-colorized electron microscope image made available by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases shows a clump of green-colored, spheroid-shaped, Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria on a purple-colored matrix. We share our bodies with trillions of mostly friendly microbes that are important for things like good digestion. Now scientists are learning how that microbial zoo can change in ways that one day might let them predict who’s at risk for brewing health problems. (NIAID via AP)
May 29, 2019 - 12:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — We share our bodies with trillions of microbes that are critical to staying healthy, but now scientists are getting a much-needed close look at how those bugs can get out of whack and spur disease. One lesson: A single test to see what gut bacteria you harbor won't tell much...
Read More
Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images
May 09, 2019 - 3:09 pm
( KMOX ) Did you think you were going to have a heart attack watching the St. Louis Blues' double-overtime Game 7 win over the Dallas Stars on Tuesday night? There's evidence avid sports fans may be putting their heart at risk if they get too caught up in the game. "Turns out there have been...
Read More