Insurance industry regulation

FILE- In this Dec. 13, 2019, file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks at a campaign event in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
Associated Press
January 08, 2020 - 9:46 am
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Increasingly alarmed that Bernie Sanders could become their party's presidential nominee, establishment-minded Democrats are warning primary voters that the self-described democratic socialist would struggle to defeat President Donald Trump and hurt the party's chances in...
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Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a campaign event at Keene State College in Keene, N.H., Saturday, Aug. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
Associated Press
August 27, 2019 - 3:57 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Wrapping himself in the legacy of "Obamacare," Joe Biden is offering restless Democrats a health care proposal that goes far beyond it, calling for a government plan almost anybody can join but stopping short of a total system remake. Recent polls show softening support for the...
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FILE - In this Sept. 3, 1949, file photo, Brigadier Gen. Wallace Harry Graham, right, personal physician of President Harry S. Truman checks his blood pressure in the president's office in Washington. Seventy years ago, before Medicare existed to inspire “Medicare for All,” a Democratic president wrestled with a challenge strikingly similar to what the party’s White House hopefuls face today. Harry Truman, then in his fourth year of pressing for a national health insurance system, parried criticism of his approach in terms that a single-payer health care advocate might use in 2019.(AP Photo/Henry Griffin, File)
August 04, 2019 - 11:27 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Seventy years ago, before Medicare existed to inspire "Medicare for All," a Democratic president wrestled with a challenge strikingly similar to what the party's White House hopefuls face today. Harry Truman, then in his fourth year of pressing for a national health insurance...
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FILE - In this May 8, 2019, file photo, Uber and Lyft drivers carry signs during a demonstration outside of Uber headquarters in San Francisco. The ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft say they are willing to change the way they treat drivers in California. That could include paying a base wage and providing certain benefits. But the companies are arguing they need to continue to classify drivers as independent contractors, not employees. California lawmakers are considering legislation that would tighten the rules around how companies classify workers as contractors. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
June 12, 2019 - 8:03 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft say they are willing to change the way they treat drivers in California as long as state lawmakers don't require them to classify drivers as employees, a move that would entitle them to a wide range of benefits. The California-based...
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