Genetics

Dr. Jason Comander, inherited retinal disorder specialist at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston points to a model of an eye during an interview on Jan. 8, 2020. Comander's hospital plans to enroll patients in a gene editing treatment for blindness study. He said it marks “a new era in medicine” using a technology that “makes editing DNA much easier and much more effective.” (AP Photo/Rodrique Ngowi)
Associated Press
March 04, 2020 - 4:03 am
Scientists say they have used the gene editing tool CRISPR inside someone's body for the first time, a new frontier for efforts to operate on DNA, the chemical code of life, to treat diseases. A patient recently had it done at the Casey Eye Institute at Oregon Health & Science University in...
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FILE - In this Aug. 14, 2018 file photo, a doctor looks at a PET brain scan at the Banner Alzheimers Institute in Phoenix. Two experimental drugs failed to prevent or slow mental decline in a study of people who are virtually destined to develop Alzheimer's disease at a relatively young age because of rare gene flaws. The results announced Monday, Feb. 10, 2020, are another disappointment for the approach that scientists have focused on for many years -- trying to remove a harmful protein that builds up in the brains of people with the disease. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
Associated Press
February 10, 2020 - 7:04 am
Two experimental drugs failed to prevent or slow mental decline in a study of people who are virtually destined to develop Alzheimer's disease at a relatively young age because they inherited rare gene flaws. The results announced Monday are another disappointment for the approach that scientists...
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Fred Gmitter, a geneticist at the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center, right, visits a citrus grower in an orange grove affected by citrus greening disease in Fort Meade, Fla., on Sept. 27, 2018. "If we can go in and edit the gene, change the DNA sequence ever so slightly by one or two letters, potentially we'd have a way to defeat this disease," says Gmitter. (AP Photo/Federica Narancio)
November 14, 2018 - 12:08 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The next generation of biotech food is headed for the grocery aisles, and first up may be salad dressings or granola bars made with soybean oil genetically tweaked to be good for your heart. By early next year, the first foods from plants or animals that had their DNA "edited" are...
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