Gang-related crime

FILE - In this July 3, 2014 file photo, former Illinois Gov. George Ryan speaks at his home in Kankakee, Ill. The trial of an ex-University of Illinois grad charged with killing a Chinese scholar is the first federal death-penalty trial in Illinois since it abolished the death penalty and some activists aren't happy about it. Former Gov. George Ryan, who took the first step toward abolishing the state's death penalty by placing a moratorium on executions in Illinois in 2000, a year after the state's last execution, said the federal decision to hold a death penalty trial there subverted the will of the majority of the residents. The trial in which openings are set for Wednesday, June 12, highlights the rarity of such cases. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)
June 10, 2019 - 5:30 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — A perplexed prospective juror at the trial of a former graduate student charged with kidnapping and killing a University of Illinois scholar from China said during jury selection last week that she didn't understand how a conviction could carry the death penalty in Illinois when the...
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FILE - In this April 10, 2009, file photo, Correctional Officer Jose Sandoval inspects one of the more than 2,000 cell phones confiscated from inmates at California State Prison, Solano in Vacaville, Calif. Judges in California and South Carolina have ordered cellphone carriers to shut down nearly 200 contraband phones used by inmates in state prisons to coordinate drug deals, gang operations and even murders. California's corrections chief tells The Associated Press on Monday, July 23, 2018, that it's the first time prison officials obtained warrants requiring a mass shutdown of contraband phones. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
July 23, 2018 - 7:24 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Judges in California and South Carolina have ordered cellphone carriers to disable nearly 200 contraband cellphones used by inmates to orchestrate crimes behind and outside prison walls, the most sweeping order of its kind ever won by corrections officials. It's an...
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