Health

The Milestone Tracker phone app from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is displayed on Thursday, Nov. 22, 2018, in New York. The app was created to help parents recognize developmental delays. (AP Photo/Jenny Kane)
November 26, 2018 - 12:07 am
How many American children have autism? The U.S. government answers that question at least three different ways and says the latest estimate — 1 in 40 kids — doesn't necessarily mean the numbers are rising. The new number, published Monday in Pediatrics , is from one of three periodic surveys the...
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Fred Gmitter, a geneticist at the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center, right, visits a citrus grower in an orange grove affected by citrus greening disease in Fort Meade, Fla., on Sept. 27, 2018. "If we can go in and edit the gene, change the DNA sequence ever so slightly by one or two letters, potentially we'd have a way to defeat this disease," says Gmitter. (AP Photo/Federica Narancio)
November 14, 2018 - 12:08 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The next generation of biotech food is headed for the grocery aisles, and first up may be salad dressings or granola bars made with soybean oil genetically tweaked to be good for your heart. By early next year, the first foods from plants or animals that had their DNA "edited" are...
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FILE - In this Thursday, April 25, 2013 file photo, elementary school third graders run under a rainbow colored tarp during the 15th Annual Kansas Kids Fitness Day, in Hutchinson, Kan. New federal guidelines released on Monday, Nov. 12, 2018, advise that children as young as age 3 should move more, sit less and get more active, and that any amount and any type of exercise helps health. (Aaron Marineau/The Hutchinson News via AP)
November 12, 2018 - 7:01 am
CHICAGO (AP) — New U.S. guidelines on exercise advise starting sooner to get children active to avoid health problems later in life. Physical activity guidelines used to start at age 6, but now they recommend involving kids as young as 3 in active play throughout the day. For adults, the advice...
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This microscope image provided by the Van Andel Research Institute in October 2018 shows an abnormal protein that is a hallmark of Parkinson’s disease clumped inside the appendix. New research suggests Parkinson’s, a brain disease, may get its start in the gut _ specifically, the appendix. (Van Andel Research Institute via AP)
October 31, 2018 - 1:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have found a new clue that Parkinson's disease may get its start not in the brain but in the gut — the appendix, to be exact. New research suggests the appendix acts as a reservoir for an abnormal protein that inside the brain becomes a hallmark of Parkinson's. And...
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